Skip to main content

The Others (2001)


Ghost stories are one of the hardest things to do visually without resorting to extensive CGI or gore to bring the scares.  Finding a good, solid, suspenseful ghost movie is a challenge for someone like me.

Living in an isolated manor during World War Two, the Stewarts find themselves alone and depending on each other to survive the threat of invasion.  Adding to their isolation is the affliction that affects the two children.  One day, they hire some servants... only to find that they'd brought "The Others" with them.

Or maybe "The Others" were there all along already...

This is not a fast paced story.  It slowly builds and builds.  It slowly, but surely adds on the suspense, the unease, the creepiness until you're looking over your shoulder into the shadows of your closet or under the bed.  The characters all get equal time and development as the story progresses.  They all serve a purpose to the unfolding of the tale.  I could imagine someone telling this story around a crackling fire while the flickering light dances across their face like spirits waving tendrils of mist in time to the cadence.

ALL of the actors, whether they had a lead role, or a supporting role were great.  Nicole Kidman and Fionnula Flanagan especially stood out- as did Alakina Mann.  These three women were the driving force behind the events of the movie, and they drove it with deft skill and natural (or supernatural if you will) ease.

I loved the look of "The Others".  The general earth tones, with an occasional spot of colour really helped to create a unreal atmosphere when paired with the superb use of candles, kerosene lamps, and fireplaces for lighting.  The way the shadows lay across the sets and characters accentuated the feeling of isolation and being trapped.  There are some spectacular camera angles and edits that move the story along at a steady pace.

"The Others" is one of those rare ghost stories that gets it right from beginning to end.  I would definitely recommend that people give it a watch- and possibly add to their collections.  Without a doubt, I'm giving it a spot in "The Good"

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Meridian: Kiss of the Beast (1990)

Sometimes, a director/producer will surprise you- such was the case during " Terrorpolooza 2012 " when I watched Charles Band's " Meridian: Kiss of the Beast " Catherine Bomarzini has come home after her father's death.  Needing company, she asks Gina to stay with her.  Soon, the two meet a wondering troupe of performers that Catherine invites to dinner at her castle. Catherine find herself pulled into a love triangle and an ancient curse that only she can break. After watching movies like " Evil Bong ", and " Demonic Toys ", I really wasn't expecting too much from this Charles Band movie- but I was pleasantly surprised by it. The story is actually quite interesting with lots of potential for eerie scenes, and character development.  It's a nice twist on the classic " Beauty and the Beast " story.  It's a bit slower than most of Band's other works, but moves smoothly and draws you with it. I have to ad

The Amityville Horror (1979)

When it comes to movies, the horror genre is one of the few where houses are as much a character as the humans.  Certain houses are immediately identifiable with certain movies: The Meyers house from John Carpenter's " Halloween "; Nancy's house from Wes Craven's " A Nightmare on Elm St "; Norman Bate's house from Alfred Hitchcock's " Psycho "; and The Lutz home from any " Amityville Horror " movie. George and Kathy Lutz have just moved into 112 Ocean Ave- where a brutal mass murder had occured just the year before.  Soon, however, their dream house becomes a house of horrors and the couple must fight to protect their children from the evil that resides with them... and keep it from causing history to repeat itself... There has always been controversy regarding the background for the movie, since it's based on a book documenting the experiences of the real-life Lutz family.  Because of this controversy,